The EUIPO

The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is responsible for the examination and granting of EUTMs (European Union Trade Marks) and RCDs (Registered Community Designs).
The resulting IP automatically covers all EU Member States, along with some associated national territories.

EU Member States:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the
Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and the UK (for now!).

EUTMs: Other territories automatically covered:

Åland Islands, Azores, Ceuta and Melilla, Canary Islands, French Guiana, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe (including St. Barthélemy and French part of Saint-Martin), Isle of Man, Jersey, Martinique,
Madeira, and Réunion.

Note – according to the UK IPO, EUTMs are recognised and protected without re-registration in the Isle of Man and Jersey.

EUTMs: Territories with links to Europe not automatically covered:

Northern part of Cyprus, Faroe Islands, Greenland, New Caledonia and dependencies, French Polynesia, French Southern and Antarctic territories, Wallis and Futuna Islands, Mayotte, SaintPierre
and Miquelon, Aruba, Netherland Antilles, Anguilla, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Monserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena and dependencies, British Antarctic
territory, British Indian Ocean territory, Turks and Caicos Islands, British Virgin Islands, Bermuda, Cayman Islands* and Falklands Islands**.
*Extension of EUTMs may be applied for in the Cayman Islands. **Extension of EUTMs is automatic in the Falklands Islands when the mark is also registered in the UK. Protection is
based on national law and not under EU law.

RCDs: Other territories which can be covered:

RCDs are recognised and protected without re-registration in the Isle of Man. It is possible to reregister RCDs in Jersey and Guernsey.

The EPO

The European Patent Office (EPO) is responsible for European patents under the EPC (European Patent Convention). The EPC is a treaty providing a legal system for the central filing and grant
of European patents. It is only after grant that the patent breaks up into a bundle of national patents. The EPO system is separate from the EU and covers a wider range of countries. The
EPO has full member states (also known as designation states), plus optional extension and validation states.

EPO: Full Member States:

Albania#, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland#, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein#,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia#, Malta, Monaco#, Netherlands, Norway#, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino#, Serbia#, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland#, Turkey#,
and the UK.

EPO: Optional Extension States:

Bosnia and Herzegovina#, and Montenegro#.

EPO: Optional Validation States:

Morocco#, and Republic of Moldova#.

# = countries that are not EU Member States.

Content accurate as of June 2017.